Get Email Updates!

Concentration of CO2 in the Atmosphere

Green Energy Times January Issue

The January, 2019 issue of Green Energy Times is now available online. You can download it HERE.

Individual articles will be posted over the next few days.

New webcast: The State of Green Business 2019

The State of Green Business 2019

Tuesday, February 5, 2019 1:00-2:00pm ET (10:00-11:00 am PT) | 60 minutes

Join us for the release of the 12th annual edition of State of Green Business, GreenBiz Group’s award-winning annual report.

Each year, the report looks at 10 key trends and dozens of metrics assessing how, and how much, companies are moving the needle on the world’s most pressing environmental challenges. The report is produced in partnership with Trucost, part of S&P Global, a world leader in helping companies, investors, governments, academics and thought leaders understand the economic consequences of natural capital dependency.

In this one-hour webcast, coinciding with the report’s release, GreenBiz Group chairman and executive editor Joel Makower, Trucost CEO Richard Mattison and Libby Bernick, Global Head of Corporate Business for Trucost. Together, they will provide insights into key trends and metrics in sustainable business, including some new metrics introduced in this year’s report on how companies are managing their climate and natural capital risks.

Among the topics:

  • The climate’s growing problem of “super pollutants”
  • How climate-risk disclosure is taking investors by storm
  • Why green loans are attracting lower interest rates
  • The new focus on soil as a climate solution
  • Why reuse is making a comeback
  • How sustainability jobs are becoming embedded in companies

Moderator: Joel Makower, Chairman and Executive Editor, GreenBiz Group

Speakers:
Richard Mattison, Chief Executive Officer, Trucost, part of S&P Dow Jones Indices
Libby Bernick, Managing Director and Global Head of Corporate Business, S&P Global

Click here to register

Jan 23 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Agrivoltaics: Solar Panels On Farms Could Be A Win-Win” • A dual-use solar installation is sometimes called agrivoltaics. The system uses a PV array raised far enough off the ground and spaced in such a way that some crops can still grow around and beneath the panels. It enables farmers diversify their income by generating renewable energy. [Civil Eats]

Agrivoltaic system (Photo courtesy of Hyperion Systems)

  • “8minutenergy Boasts Solar + Storage Pipeline In Excess Of 10 GW” • The largest US private solar and storage developer, 8minutenergy, announced last week that it has entered into a joint venture with JP Morgan Asset Management to support 8minutenergy’s current 10.7 GW pipeline of solar + storage projects. [CleanTechnica]
  • “Record Number Of Americans ‘Very Worried’ About Climate Change, Report Finds” • More Americans now say that climate change is a real threat to themselves and others. According to a climate report by researchers at Yale University and George Mason University, 29% are very worried, and 73% say they believe global warming is happening. [CNN]
  • “How Free Markets Are Embracing Renewable Energy” • Instead of offering subsidies or incentives for renewable energy, Chile amended its laws to allow wind and solar technologies to compete in electricity capacity auctions. It let the market work, the cost of renewable power fell sharply, and fossil fuels could no longer compete. [Reaction]
  • “Colorado Power Companies Bet Big On Net-Zero Emissions As State Debates 100% Renewable Energy Future” • Colorado Gov Jared Polis has a goal of 100% renewable energy on the grid by 2040. The utilities have opted for a net-zero carbon emissions goal instead. Platt River would achieve it by 2030, and Xcel Energy by 2050. [The Colorado Sun]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

January 22 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Massachusetts Bill Would Set New Emissions Requirements” • A bill filed at the Massachusetts Statehouse seeks to help speed the state’s transition to renewable forms of energy. The bill would update state emissions requirements: 50% below 1990 emissions levels by 2030, 75% below by 2040, and net zero emissions by 2050. [Electric Light & Power]

Back Bay neighborhood of Boston

  • “New York Governor’s Green New Deal Starts With 1 GW Of Large-Scale Solar” • New York state has awarded 1 GW of solar and 614 MW of wind. Three of the 20 renewable energy projects commissioned are paired with energy storage. Invenergy, EDF, and NextEra are each set to build solar projects with capacities greater than 100 MW. [pv magazine International]
  • “‘The Only Thing We Can Do Is Adapt’: Greenland Ice Melt Reaching ‘Tipping Point,’ Study Finds” • Climate change is causing Greenland’s massive ice sheets to melt much faster than previously thought, a study found, and it may be “too late” to do anything about it. The findings could have dire implications for the planet’s low-lying islands and coastal cities. [CNN]
  • “74% Of India’s New Power Capacity Addition In 2018 Was Renewables” • India added a total (net) of 17.6 GW of power generation capacity in 2018, and a record 74% of that capacity was renewable, primarily solar power. The huge renewable capacity coming online made 2018 the greenest year so far, in terms of new capacity. [CleanTechnica]
  • “Report: Renewable Energy Could Replace Economic Loss From Closure Of San Juan Generating Station” • Closing the San Juan coal-fired power plant and mine does not have to doom the town of Waterflow, New Mexico, according to an economist’s report. The site is an excellent candidate to be redeveloped for green energy production. [KRWG]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

January 21 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “SF moves toward public power and a ‘local version of a green new deal’” • San Francisco’s push to move to a public power system after PG&E said it will file for bankruptcy is not the only big energy plan in the making. Supporters of the city’s renewable energy program are calling for the city’s own “local version of a green new deal.” [San Francisco Examiner]

Sunset Reservoir solar system (Gil Riego Jr | Special to The SF Examiner)

  • “China Approves 24 Offshore Wind Projects” • The Chinese government approved 24 offshore wind projects off Jiangsu Province. Local media reports that the projects will have a total capacity of 6.7 GW and will involve an investment of around $18 billion. The wind farms are expected to be operational by the end of 2020. [The Maritime Executive]
  • “Electric Co-op Sets Ambitious Goal To Cut Carbon By 50%” • La Plata Electric Association set ambitious goals last week to cut its carbon footprint by 50% and keep costs lower than 70% of its peer cooperatives in Colorado. LPEA gets 95% of its electricity from Tri-State Generation and Transmission, which is heavily dependent on coal. [The Durango Herald]
  • “Clean-Energy Agenda Sees Power Surge In Augusta” • After running as a Democrat and winning a House seat in November in a heavily Republican district that includes her hometown of Nobleboro, Chloe Maxmin is following her environmental convictions as the lead sponsor of a bill to create a Green New Deal in Maine. She is not alone. [Press Herald]
  • “Wind Farm Expansion To Power Local Homes” • The wind in the western Massachusetts town of Hancock is bringing power to several communities in the central parts of the state. The Brodie Mountain Wind Power Project is starting phase two construction, adding two 2.3-MW turbines to the existing 10-turbine, 15-MW system. [Worcester Telegram]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

January 20 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Iran To Construct 3000 New Small-Scale Solar Plants In Rural Areas” • Iran’s Deputy Energy Minister said 3000 new small-scale solar plants are going to be constructed in the country’s underprivileged and rural areas by the end of the current Iranian calendar year (March 20, 2019). He said this adds to 2000 plants already operating. [Al-Bawaba]

Small solar system (Shutterstock image)

  • “Frustration Over Feed-In Tariff Pushes Tasmanian Solar Producers Towards Batteries ” • There are about 28,500 Tasmanians with home PV systems. Over half of them installed their PVs before September 2013, when the feed-in tariff was about 28¢/kWh. Now that the FIT is dropping to 8.5¢/kWh, many are getting batteries. [ABC News]
  • “It’s Up To California To Save Us From This Trump Rollback” • As President Donald Trump races to gut the auto mileage and emissions program of the Obama administration, the California Air Resources Board, an agency little known outside the state, could help protect us from the rollback. At stake are the health of the world and US competitiveness. [CNN]
  • “Addressing The Microgrid Stability Challenge With MVDC” • Microgrids are generally isolated from one another. As their numbers increase, the opportunity for them to be mutually supportive increases. Medium voltage direct current technology makes it possible to connect microgrids together with precise control. [Transmission and Distribution World]
  • “Bringing Hydroelectric To Dams Like Newburgh Just Got Easier” • Last year, Rep Larry Buschon successfully guided legislation through Congress to make developing hydropower easier. He hopes it will renew interest in developing hydropower at the dams in Newburgh, Indiana, and Union Town, Kentucky, along with others. [Evansville Courier & Press]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

Special Non-Profit & Government Employee Pricing at BuildingEnergy Boston

Receive Over $100 Off Registration!

In an effort to diversify our community and make the amazing content of BuildingEnergy Boston more accessible, NESEA offers special pricing to government and non-profit employees.

With non-profit/government employee pricing, you can purchase a full conference pass for $540 ($120 off the regular price) or a one-day pass for $360 ($90 off the regular price). View full pricing information here.

Use the code BOS19NPGOVFULL for a 2-day pass or BOS19NPGOV1DAY for a 1-day pass. Questions? Email us at registration@nesea.org or call us at (413) 774-6051 ext. 19.

Register Now!

January 19 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “Keene, NH, Commits To 100% Renewable Energy Goal” • The city council of Keene, NH, voted 14-1 to adopt a goal of moving to 100% renewable energy, the Sierra Club has announced. Keene joins four other New Hampshire communities, Concord, Cornish, Hanover, and Plainfield, that have established the 100% renewable goal. [North American Windpower]

Fall foliage

  • “Idaho’s New Governor: ‘Climate Change Is Real’” • Idaho Gov Brad Little has broken with Republican Party leaders on climate change, declaring unequivocally that the phenomenon is real. He said, “I’m old enough that I remember feeding cows all winter long in deep snow … boy, back in the old days when I was a kid, we had winters.” [High Country News]
  • “Vermont’s Largest Solar Canopy Comes Online” • Vermont’s largest solar canopy, Encore Renewable Energy’s 156-kW solar carport in Burlington, has begun producing electricity at the ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain. Built in 2003, the science and nature center was the first LEED-certified building in Vermont. [CleanTechnica]
  • “Coal Ash Is Contaminating Groundwater In At Least 22 States, Utility Reports Show” • A clear picture of coal ash contamination in the US is emerging, as utilities report serious groundwater contamination in at least 22 states. In many cases, immediate environmental action has been required, and several states are moving on this. [InsideClimate News]
  • “DC Mayor Signs Historic Climate Legislation For 100% Renewables” • DC Mayor Muriel Bowser signed the “Clean Energy DC Omnibus Act of 2018,” which the DC Council had passed unanimously in December. The District is leading on climate action by requiring a 100% renewable electricity supply by 2032. [Windpower Engineering]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

January 18 Green Energy News

Headline News:

  • “UK Signals Shift From Nuclear To Renewables” • The UK’s government has signalled a big shift away from nuclear energy and towards renewables after Hitachi announced it was scrapping work on a new reactor because of the plummeting costs of offshore wind and solar power. Only one nuclear plant is still being developed in the UK. [The Week UK]

Wind turbine (Christopher Furlong | Getty Images)

  • “Reason Australian Households Are Paying An Extra $200 A Year For Electricity” • Privatisation of the electricity industry has not delivered what it promised, a report has found. A report, from the Australia Institute, says customers now pay $100 to $200 per year extra to cover the costs of things like advertising, sales, and marketing. [NEWS.com.au]
  • “Energy Dept Tackles Challenge Of Rooftop Solar & Income Inequality” • Economic justice advocates are taking note that rooftop solar power deployment in the US has a taken on a racial tinge, with significantly more penetration in predominantly white neighborhoods. The DOE is acting to take on part, though not all, of that issue. [CleanTechnica]
  • “Ford Says An Electric F-150 Is Coming” • Speaking to the press at the North American International Auto Show in Detroit, Ford’s president of global markets, said, “Here’s what’s going to happen next to future-proof that global juggernaut of commercial vehicles. We’re going to be electrifying the F-Series, both battery-electric and hybrid.” [CleanTechnica]
  • “AG Healey Endorses Version Of ‘Green New Deal’ – 100% ‘Renewable’ Energy” • Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey committed herself to an ambitious new clean energy goal as part of a broader plan included a promise to fight gun violence and reduce barriers to mental health treatment, among other issues. [NewBostonPost]

For more news, please visit geoharvey – Daily News about Energy and Climate Change.

BRIEF NEWS UPDATE: FERC Data Suggest New Renewable Capacity Could Be 4x Greater Than Fossil Fuels by 2021

SUN DAY CAMPAIGN

NOTWITHSTANDING A STRONG SHOWING  BY NATURAL GAS IN 2018, 

FERC REPORTS NEW RENEWABLE ENERGY CAPACITY  COULD QUADRUPLE THAT OF FOSSIL FUELS

OVER NEXT THREE YEARS

Contact:         Ken Bossong, 301-270-6477 x.6            

Washington DC – According to an analysis by the SUN DAY Campaign of the latest data released by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), natural gas dominated new electrical generating capacity in 2018. However, renewable energy sources (i.e., biomass, geothermal, hydropower, solar, wind) may be poised to swamp fossil fuels as new generating capacity is added over the next three years.

FERC’s “Energy Infrastructure Update” report (with data through November 30, 2018) notes that new natural gas generation placed in service during the first 11 months of 2018 totaled 16,687 MW or 68.46% of the total (24,376 MW). Renewable sources accounted for only 30.12% led by wind (3,772 MW) and solar (3,449MW).*

However, the same report indicates that proposed generation and retirements by December 2021 include net capacity additions by renewable sources of 169,914 MW. That is 4.3 times greater than the net new additions listed for coal, oil, and natural gas combined (39,414 MW).

Net proposed generation additions from wind alone total 90,268 MW while those from solar are 64,066 MW — each greater than that listed for natural gas (56,881 MW). FERC lists only a single new 17-MW coal unit for the three-year period but 16,122 MW in retirements. Oil will also decline by 1,362 MW while nuclear power is depicted as remaining largely unchanged (i.e., a net increase of 69 MW).

FERC’s data also reveal that renewable sources now account for 20.8% of total available installed U.S. generating capacity.** Utility-scale solar is nearly 3% (i.e., 2.94%) while hydropower and wind account for 8.42% and 7.77% respectively.

# # # # # # # # #

* FERC only reports data for utility-scale facilities (i.e., those rated 1-MW or greater) and therefore its data does not reflect the capacity of distributed renewables, notably rooftop solar PV which accounts for approximately 30% of the nation’s installed solar capacity.

** Capacity is not the same as actual generation. Capacity factors for nuclear power and fossil fuels tend to be higher than those for most renewables. For the first ten months of 2018, the U.S. Energy Information Administration reports that renewables accounted for 17.6% of the nation’s total electrical generation – that is, a bit less than their share of installed generating capacity (20.8%).

Source:

FERC’s 6-page “Energy Infrastructure Update for November 2018” was released in early January 2019. In a seeming departure from its norm, FERC did not announce the release of this report on its web page and a specific release date does not appear on the report itself. However, it is assumed the report was issued within the past week. It can be found at: https://www.ferc.gov/legal/staff-reports/2018/nov-energy-infrastructure.pdf.  For the information cited in this update, see the tables entitled “New Generation In-Service (New Build and Expansion),” “Total Available Installed Generating Capacity,” and “Proposed Generation Additions and Retirements by October 2021.”

View the Session Lineup for BuildingEnergy Boston

Register Now!

View this Year’s Conference Sessions!

You won’t want to miss the content at this year’s BuildingEnergy BostonConference + Trade Show, March 14–15 at the Westin Boston Waterfront.

This is our most diverse and envelope-pushing session lineup to date (with topics like prefabricated & offsite construction, carbon-neutral cities, and healthy building materials). View all 45 of this year’s accredited sessions here.

Thursday Session 1 (10:30am–12pm)

Thursday Session 2 (1:30pm–3pm)

Thursday Session 3 (3:30pm–5pm)

Friday Session 1 (8:30am–9:30am)

Friday Session 2 (10am–11:30am)

Friday Session 3 (1pm–2pm)

Friday Session 4 (2:30pm–3:30pm)

Register Now!

Book a Room & Offset Your Carbon Footprint!

We are partnering with TripZero to offer you the best hotel rates while helping to offset the carbon footprint created by conference travel. NESEA’s room block at the Westin expires February 20, but it may sell out sooner, so make your reservation now through our secure portal.

Book a Room